Together we can make a difference.

WASH Program

Our aim is to provide safe and accessible drinking water and improve hygiene and sanitation in communities.

Without water you can’t grow food, you can’t build housing, you can’t stay healthy, you can’t stay in school and you can’t keep working. Care for Africa is working towards providing  access to water and sanitation for the people within the communities that we operate in.

The act of installing a deep water well for a community addresses the core root of poverty by reducing the incidence of water borne diseases, increasing education opportunities for women and children who are relieved from water collecting duties and increases opportunities for engage in income generating income activities.

The women and children bear the burden of walking many kilometres each day to find water in streams and ponds, full of water-borne disease which makes them and their families sick. Illness and the time lost fetching it robs entire communities of their futures. The girls spend many of their days collecting water for their family, rather than attending school. Care for Africa provides access to clean drinking water through the installation of deep-water wells and water harvesting systems into schools and major collection points.

Care for Africa provides access to clean drinking water through the installation of deep-water wells and water harvesting systems into schools and major collection points (including the Tarime Government Hospital and community health dispensaries). By installing deep water wells into schools children are encouraged, by their families, to attend school. They are able to collect water during the day and then return home (after school) with clean, safe water for their families. 

The WASH Team

Dr John Wettenhall OAM – Director

Diana Butler OAM– CEO

Abdallah Obedi – Country Manager

Mangira Drilling – Tarime District Water Engineer Drilling Company

“Water scarcity, poor water quality and inadequate sanitation negatively impact food security, livelihood choices and educational opportunities for poor families across the world. At the current time, more than 2 billion people are living with the risk of reduced access to freshwater resources ad by 2050, at least one in four people is likely to live in a country affected by chronic and recurring shortages of fresh water.”

UN Sustainable Goals
waterwell

Water Well Installation

Care for Africa provides access to clean drinking water through the installation of deep-water wells and water harvesting systems into schools and major collection points.

sanitation

Improved Sanitation​

Proper sanitation prevents human effluent returning to the soil and re-infecting the water source in the community.

Gradually, we are building proper sanitation blocks in the schools that we support.

tippy

Tippy Taps

As the children are returning to school, we are giving them the facilities that will provide safe hygiene practices during the coronavirus pandemic and beyond.

We are making tippy taps – a simple, easy to make device that will enable the children to wash their hands under running water.

10 Water Wells

have now been installed in schools since 2011.

3 Sanitation blocks

are now in use within our communities and schools.

Often called “the greatest nightmare of Africa, poor sanitation and open defecation practices kill more children every year than AIDS, malaria, and measles combined, the World Health Organization and UNICEF estimate."

www.globalcitizen

Overall it is a successful program, but one which has demonstrated the need for ongoing monitoring of facilities that we have provided, and speedy repair when breakages occur.

Dr John Wettenhall OAM Chair

Interested in getting involved with the WASH program?

Volunteer, fundraise or make a donation.

“Safe water and access to proper sanitation are essential to eradicate poverty, build peaceful societies and ensure that no one is left behind on the path towards sustainable development.

2019 UN World Water Development Report

Looking for More Information?

Surubu: Installed 2011, services up to 9,000 people.

Mtana: Installed 2013,  re-sleeved in 2015 with PVC piping, services over 3,000 people   Funding: Australian Government through Aus Aid

Kiterere: A well repaired by replacing galvanised piping with PVC eliminating rust previously present in the water. 1,200 people using the well.  Funding: Australian Government through Aus Aid

Bugango (Kongo): A well installed 2014. Services over 1,500 people.  Funded by proceeds from the Launceston Care for Africa Ball 

Bisarwi: A well installed 2015. Services 2,700 people.  Funded by proceeds from the Launceston Care for Africa Ball 

Sombanyasoko: A well installed 2016. Services 1,850 people.   Funding: The Boat Harbour Craft Group (Tasmania): The Ties that Bind Us

Kibhosere: A well installed 2016. Services 750 people. Funder by proceeds from the Mt Kilimanjaro: Walk for Water- 2016

Komaswa: A well installed 2016. Services 1,000 people. Funder: The Rotary Club of Glenorchy,  Tasmania

Nyamerambaro: A well installed 2019. Services 500 people Funder: Australian Government through the Direct Aid Program (DAP)

Magreth Remagwe School: A well installed 2020. Services over 5,000 people Funders: Longford Blooms & The Rotary Club of Launceston

Tarime Government Hospital: A well installed 2018. Waiting for Tarime Town Council to pipe into the hospital. Will service 500 people per day. Funder: Charlie Perry  2014, gap student volunteer  

Surubu Dispensary: Water Harvesting System with a 70,000L underground tank. Services 9,000 people that may attend the dispensary.  Funder: Australian Government through Aus Aid

Once a water well is established it is essential that we build a nearby sanitation block. 

Proper sanitation prevents human effluent returning to the soil and re-infecting the water source in the community. 

Gradually, we are building proper sanitation blocks in the schools that we support. We have built 3 sanitation toilet blocks: 

Bisarwi School: Installed 2015 and used by 1,060 Students

Funded by proceeds from the Launceston Care for Africa Ball 

Surubu School: Installed 2016 and used by 900 Students

Funded by proceeds from the Melbourne Care for Africa Ball 

Mtana School: Installed 2017 and used by 1,111 Students

Funder: MAP Foundation

The sanitation blocks are built according to the Tanzanian and United Nations guidelines for rural sanitation toilets in Tanzania. Included in the sanitation block is a private room for the girls to access with water for washing and privacy. This room is essential to enable us to develop and establish the Days for Girls program. Days for Girls is a global movement that prepares and distributes sustainable menstrual health solutions to girls who would otherwise miss school during their monthly periods.

These facilities have been funded by Care for Africa. However, the local community has contributed significantly to these projects. It is imperative that we have community participation and promote social inclusion in all that we do to. This is the key to a successful project outcome.

Often called “the greatest nightmare of Africa, poor sanitation and open defecation practices kill more children every year than AIDS, malaria, and measles combined, the World Health Organization and UNICEF estimate.” www.global citizen

Tippy taps are a simple and cost-effective handwashing solution helping families, schools and communities to improve health and hygiene.

The importance of handwashing

It seems simple, but handwashing plays an important role in our health and wellbeing.

In developing nations, proper handwashing is the key to preventing the spread of many potentially life-threatening diseases. It can also lower the risk of respiratory infection by up to 16 percent. On top of this, communities with adequate soap and water amenities often say that it results in a sense of comfort and pride.

But for some, it’s not so easy to access clean water, which poses an obstacle to safe handwashing. In some communities, the only water source is more than a 30-minute walk from home.

How tippy taps work

Tippy taps are easy to build, and even simpler to use, bringing contactless handwashing stations to villages and schools globally. They are easily maintained and can be built from materials found locally.

A tippy tap can be created with just a five-litre water container, a few poles or long sticks, some string and some soap. In communities where soap is not available, wood ash, sand or soil can be used instead.

First, a pole is placed through the handle of the container, which is then held up by two other poles, one on each side.

A hole is made in the cap of the container and a piece of string is pulled through, then tied to a stick which is placed on the floor. This stick acts as a pedal, tipping the container forward.

A hole in the container just under the cap allows water to slowly flow out.

Liquid soap is then tied to the tap with some string, and the tippy tap is ready to use.

  • Average school attendance pre-deep water well is 63% but after installation is 90%.
  • Our clinical data has shown a significant decrease in water borne diseases to only 2% in the 2019 clinic data. Previously it was assessed to have been much greater.
  • There is an allied opportunity to create a breakfast program which will feed the children. Most of the children walk many kilometres to school with no breakfast. By providing a daily breakfast to children in school we remove hunger as a barrier to learning. An active feeding programme encourages pupils to attend school in the first place and then keeps them there throughout the day. School attendances are estimated to have increased and often stand at  100%. 
  • The programme  provides health and educational benefits to these vulnerable and impoverished children by helping to keep minds and bodies fuelled for productive and successful learning, allowing them to focus on their education rather than their empty stomach. Mtana (Albainano) School grade 3 – 5 went from the bottom 5% of National examinations in 2017 to the top 90% in 2018 and the increased performance is believed to be a direct result of the introduction of the breakfast programme in 2018.
  • Fruit and shade trees have been planted to provide fruit and shade for school children. 
  • Installation of rural sanitation blocks (per UNICEF and Tanzanian Government guidelines), with a private room, with water for the girls during their menses, has promoted a new freedom for girls and enabled greater participation in relevant community activities as they enjoy greater access to their human rights.